Names on Java

(Some of these short poems see Creation as if through a child’s eyes. Some of them suggest a more mature view of the Creator. A few of them even reflect the long perspective of age. Most are not intended to be Scriptural, sometimes not even spiritual. Yet they may give your spirits a lift: By the middle of the week, who doesn’t need a chuckle or a changed outlook?)

NAMES  ON  JAVA

Names on Java – how they haunt me!
On the map they tease and taunt me.
Names that rhyme with great Jakarta –
Purwakarta, Yogyakarta.
Names with music all their own –
Cilegon and Cirebon.
Names that echo like a gong –
Bandung, Rembang, Lembang, Lembong.
Names that give a foreign feeling –
Pengalengan, Pandegiling.
Names that sound fit for a rajah –
Majalaya, Surabaya.
Oh, once you’ve traveled out as far
as Banjar or Jatijajar,
you’ll never then be satisfied
to stay at Perth or Ingleside,
New York, or York, or Telluride.
 O! your heart will burn like lava,
once you’ve known those names on Java.
(Reprinted by permission of
Carus Publishing Company,
from August 2005, Vol. 32,
No. 12 issue of CRICKET
magazine, text © 2005 by
Carus Publishing Company.)
 

Traveler, Traveler

(Some of these short poems see Creation as if through a child’s eyes. Some of them suggest a more mature view of the Creator. A few of them even reflect the long perspective of age. Most are not intended to be Scriptural, sometimes not even spiritual. Yet they may give your spirits a lift: By the middle of the week, who doesn’t need a chuckle or a changed outlook?

TRAVELER,  TRAVELER

§ Traveler, traveler, where have you been?
Up in Alaska with the winter wren.
Down in Australia near the dingo’s den.
 
   § Traveler, traveler, what did you see?
Polar bears trolling for fish in the sea.
Wallabies wobbling from tree to tree.
 
   § Traveler, traveler, where will you go?
Up to Mount Everest, mantled in snow.
Down to the Dead Sea, six miles below.
 
  § Traveler, traveler, what will you see?
Woolly yaks wandering wild and free.
Salt and sand, sand and salt by the Salt Sea.
 
Copyright © 2016 by Perry Thomas
 
 
 
 

)

Come, Someone!

(Some of these short poems see Creation as if through a child’s eyes. Some of them suggest a more mature view of the Creator. A few of them even reflect the long perspective of age. Most are not intended to be Scriptural, sometimes not even spiritual. Yet they may give your spirits a lift: By the middle of the week, who doesn’t need a chuckle or a changed outlook?)

COME,  SOMEONE!

Come, someone, and I’ll make two!
Take the train to Timbuktu.
Catch a cab to  Kathmandu.
Come, you two, and I’ll make three!
Walk to Washington, D. C.
Travel to Trincomalee.
Come, you three, and I’ll make four!
Set your sails for Singapore.
Board a bus for Bangalore.
Come, you four, and I’ll make five!
Dare the domes of Trail Ridge Drive.
Then in Denver we’ll arrive.
Come, you five, and I’ll make six!
Climb them cliffs acrost the cricks.
Camp out somewheres in the sticks.
§ Come, you six, and I’ll make seven!
Ride a donkey down to Devon.
Board a lake launch toward Loch Leven.
§ Come, you seven, and I’ll make eight!
Stop and wait at Golden Gate.
Don’t be late to celebrate!
Copyright © 2016 by Perry Thomas
 

Islands

                 (Some of these short poems see Creation as if through a child’s eyes. Some of them suggest a more mature view of the Creator. A few of them even reflect the long perspective of age. Most are not intended to be Scriptural, sometimes not even spiritual. Yet they may give your spirits a lift: By the middle of the week, who doesn’t need a chuckle or a changed outlook?)

ISLANDS

 Where shall I go?
I know, I know!
Prince Edward Island –
in summer, in snow;
Treasure Island, in sunlit seas;
Ithaca, Colchis, the isles of Greece;
Narnian isles, where The Dawn Treader sails;
a desert island, known only to whales.

 Who shall I be?
Let’s see, let’s see:
Anne of Green Gables,
spelled with an e;
Jim Hawkins, searching for pirate gold;
storm-tossed Odysseus, or Jason the bold;
Lucy and Edmund, or Eustace and Jill;
Robinson Crusoe, encamped on his hill. 
 
Copyright © 2016 by Perry Thomas