Take the Road that Twists and Turns

(Some of these short poems see Creation as if through a child’s eyes. Some of them suggest a more mature view of the Creator. A few of them even reflect the long perspective of age. Most are not intended to be Scriptural, sometimes not even spiritual. Yet they may give your spirits a lift: By the middle of the week, who doesn’t need a chuckle or a changed outlook?)

TAKE  THE  ROAD  THAT  TWISTS  AND  TURNS

Take the road that twists and turns;
others walk the easy way.
Boldly be the first who learns
what’s beyond that bluff, that bay.

   Take the road that turns and twists;
   let it lead to glad surprise.
   Push on bravely through the mists
   till the morning sun arise.

   Take the road that twists and turns;
   follow it to heart’s desire.
   Find a love that glows and burns;
   live a life like blazing fire!
 
Copyright © 2016 by Perry Thomas

Down the Road

(Some of these short poems see Creation as if through a child’s eyes. Some of them suggest a more mature view of the Creator. A few of them even reflect the long perspective of age. Most are not intended to be Scriptural, sometimes not even spiritual. Yet they may give your spirits a lift: By the middle of the week, who doesn’t need a chuckle or a changed outlook?)

DOWN   THE   ROAD

Down the road and up the slope,
what’s ahead – for you, for me?
What’s to do? What will we see?
Maybe darkness: time to grope.
Maybe hardship: can you cope?
Steep paths: always take a rope.
Blocked ways: never give up hope.
   Down the road, around the bend,
    what’s ahead – for me, for you?
    What new scenery to view?
   New ideas to comprehend.
   New and old to weigh and blend.
    Meet a stranger, make a friend.
    Mark your trail to journey’s end. 
 
Copyright © 2016 by Perry Thomas

 

What Shall I Write About?

(Some of these short poems see Creation as if through a child’s eyes. Some of them suggest a more mature view of the Creator. A few of them even reflect the long perspective of age. Most are not intended to be Scriptural, sometimes not even spiritual. Yet they may give your spirits a lift: By the middle of the week, who doesn’t need a chuckle or a changed outlook?)

WHAT  SHALL  I  WRITE  ABOUT?

What shall I write about?        
(The poet’s age-old quest.)
Where shall I find some poignant theme
 that leaves my mind no rest?
What shall I write about?
         My mind’s a total void.
If I don’t find a subject soon,
         I might get quite annoyed.   
What shall I write about?
My vacant-minded state
can give no vision for my verse,
no cause to celebrate.
What shall I write about?
If nothing’s on my mind,
does that same nothing offer truth
that I might hope to find?
    What shall I write about?
     I’ll find a seed to plant.
    Perhaps I’ll reap a masterpiece . . .
     and then perhaps I can’t.
    What shall I write about?
     It all comes down to this:
    My Maker fashioned me to write.
     Let all the praise be His. 
 
Copyright © 2016 by Perry Thomas

To the Gentle Reader

 (Some of these short poems see Creation as if through a child’s eyes. Some of them suggest a more mature view of the Creator. A few of them even reflect the long perspective of age. Most of them are not intended to be Scriptural, sometimes not even spiritual. Yet they may give your spirits a lift: By midweek, who doesn’t need a chuckle or a changed outlook?)

TO  THE  GENTLE  READER

Inspiration in verse!
O, it can be a curse
for the one who aspires to play poet.
Far too often there is
little talent for this,
And the one who aspires doesn’t know it.
Yet the Muse, when she strikes,
will admit no dislikes:
You must drop all your work and go to ’er.
Then it’s labor and toil
and the late midnight oil:
You are fair Poesy’s paramour.
My theme’s your enjoyment;
  indeed, such employment
   inflames greater pens than my own.
  Now you know where I’ve aimed,
  though my meter be maimed
   and my rhymes may cause many to moan.
  Yet I’ve published in Cricket,
  and Lemony Snicket
   could never endeavor the lines that I write.
  So ponder, dear reader,
  these moments in meter,
   and find in them passing delight.
 
Copyright © 2016 by Perry Thomas